News & Blog

6 Key Strategies for Acing a Job Interview

October 30, 2018

“Confidence comes from being prepared.” – John Wooden

 Are you on the job hunt? It can be a grueling process, particularly the interview stage. We’re sure you’ve heard it before, but confidence and preparation are key to pulling off the flawless interview. Below are six essential tips for acing a job interview. 

  1. Know Your Audience – Spend some time doing research in advance. Get to know the organization with which you’re interviewing and the industry in which they operate. On top of that—if possible—do some research into the person or people who will be conducting your interview.
  2. Know What You’re Applying For – Have a thorough understanding of the job description for the position you’re seeking. Come armed with examples of how you fulfill the various criteria listed. If there’s an area where you don’t quite qualify, be prepared to demonstrate why it is not an issue.
  3. Know How You’re Going to Answer – In the course of your interview preparations, devote time to practicing responses to common questions. Don’t just do this in your head—practice out loud, and in front of a mirror, if possible.
  4. Know How You’re Presenting Yourself – Before any words even leave your mouth, you’re already making an impression—good or bad—on the people around you. In light of that, put some thought into what you’ll wear and the attitude you’ll project via your body language. Lastly, be sure to arrive on time, if not early!
  5. Know What You Need to Bring With You – It’s a good practice to bring along extra copies of your resume and references. You should also consider carrying a notepad and writing utensil with you, in case there’s anything you want to jot down during the interview.
  6. Know What You’re Going to Ask – When your interviewers ask you if you have any questions for them, never turn them down! Demonstrate your interest in the job and curiosity about their organization with some well thought-out questions. “Well thought-out” is key—make sure you’re not asking about information that can easily be found on the organization’s website, for example.